The Last Blue Noon in May

Local Outer Banks author Joseph Terrell is one of the nicest people you’ll meet —a true Southern gentleman. Which makes the inevitable murders of his mystery novels slightly at odds with his personality. His latest book, The Last Blue Noon in May, is the sixth in his Harrison Weaver series, …

Outer Banks for Dogs!

We came across an article in the LA Times recently about pet-friendly cities, and doggone it! They didn’t list the Outer Banks… Here at Carolina Designs we’re willing to concede that maybe the Outer Banks, because it’s really a group of small towns and villages, did not quite rise to …

Studying Dolphins on the Outer Banks

Jessica Taylor has her dream job. As President and founder of the nonprofit Outer Banks Center for Dolphin Research, she is often on the water researching a marine mammal that fascinates her. “I think they’re so interesting. They’re so similar to people. Their societies, their relationships to each other,” she …

Still Moving After All These Years

As land masses go, the Outer Banks is a pretty recent addition to the earth’s geology. There are a number of theories about how and why they formed, but no consensus. There is consensus, however, on their age— estimates put their formation somewhere between 4000-5000 years ago. Originally, they were …

Navigating Outer Banks Terminology Part II

Navigating on the Outer Banks is simple; everything is either north or south. The Atlantic Ocean is to the east and extensive bays, estuaries and sounds are to the west. Even at it’s widest point, the Outer Banks is barely two miles across. Nonetheless, when asking directions and a resident …

Outer Banks Research Facilities

Throughout the years the Outer Banks has attracted more than its fair share of visitors, interlopers and those who choose to become permanent residents. Most arrive for the beauty of our beaches and relaxed lifestyle, others for water sports and recreation, fishing and hunting. More recently we’ve seen those relocating …

Five Surprising Outer Banks Facts

Every location has surprising nuggets of historical information and the Outer Banks is no exception. Here are five facts about this land by the sea that are likely not well known to those who reside outside of our region. 1. Mother Vine – The Oldest Documented Grape Vine in North …

Sounds of the Outer Banks

For those of us who migrated to the Outer Banks as adults, one of the most confusing parts of the local language was the casual use of the various sounds as a way to give a location. It’s still done today, and anyone who’s lived here ten years or more …

History of Outer Banks Town Names

Regardless of what pundits, experts, historians or local authorities may say, the name origins of many Outer Banks locations are nothing more than speculation. Some we know by fact. For example, Currituck comes from an Algonquin native American word meaning “wild geese” or “land of the wild goose.” The spelling …

The Outer Banks, a Typical Melting Pot

Over a month ago I received an email from a local community college, College of the Albemarle (COA), asking me about the process for printing a magazine.  COA, it seems, has a very active English Department, and the students and teachers had printed a magazine of their work last year …